What vulnerabilities exist for this workgroup lan

what vulnerabilities exist for this workgroup lan

Microsoft Environment Analysis Essay Sample

The five vulnerabilities that exist for this LAN based workgroup are , , , 2. Yes, the vulnerability that involves privilege elevation is (Vulnerability in TrueType Font Parsing), but it is not a high priority. likelihood of it affecting your LAN by using a combination of precautions. This paper describes many of the vulnerabilities that can exist for home wireless LAN systems, also referred to as small office/home office (SOHO) LAN systems, as well as for enterprise LAN systems. B oth LAN t ypes are vulnerable.

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. Questions: 1. What vulnerabilities exist for this workgroup LAN based on the advisories? List five of them. Do any vulnerabilities involve privilege elevation? Is this considered a high-priority issue?

Identify and document at least three vulnerabilities and the solutions related to the client what a wonderful world review. The numbers are as follows: a. Advisory — Vulnerability in Microsoft malware protection engine could allow remote code execution.

This number involves privilege elevation. Advisory — Vulnerabilities in gadgets could allow remote code execution. Advisory — Updates to improve crytograghy and digital certificate handling in Windows. Advisory — Update for vulnerabilities in Adobe flash player in Internet Explorer.

Advisory — Vulnerability in Internet Explorer could allow remote code execution. Advisory vulnerabiilities Solution Microsoft is announcing the availability of an automated Microsoft fix it solution that disables Windows sidebar vulneranilities gadgets on supported editions of Windows Vista and Windows 7. Disabling Windows sidebar and wrokgroup can help protect customers from potential attacks that leverage gadgets to execute arbitrary code.

Customers should consider the following ways that an attacker could leverage gadgets to execute arbitrary code: Microsoft is aware that some legitimate gadgets running in Windows sidebar could contain vulnerabilities. An attacker who successfully exploited a vulnerabilitiez vulnerability could run arbitrary code in the context of the current user.

If the current user is logged on with administrative user rights, an attacker could take complete control of the affected system. An attacker could create a malicious gadget and then trick a user into installing the malicious gadget.

Once installed, the malicious gadget could run arbitrary code in the context of exixt current user. Gadgets could also potentially harm your computer. Recommendation: Customers who are concerned about vulnerable or malicious Gadgets should apply the automated Microsoft fix it solution as soon as possible. Advisory — Solution. This security update resolves four privately reported vulnerabilities and one publicly disclosed vulnerability in Internet Explorer. The vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially crafted web page using Internet Explorer.

Users whose accounts are configured to have fewer user rights on the system could be less impacted than users who operate with administrative user rights.

Solution: This security update resolves seven privately reported vulnerabilities vulnerabiilties one publicly disclosed vulnerability in Internet Explorer. The more severe vulnerabilities could allow remote code execution if a user views a specially crafted Web page using Internet Explorer. Sorry, but copying text is forbidden on this website. If you need this or any other sample, we can send it to you via email. By clicking "SEND", you agree to our exiist of service and privacy policy.

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Using our plagiarism checker for free you will exkst the requested result within 3 vulnerabilitiws directly to your email. Jump the queue with a membership plan, get unlimited samples and plagiarism results — immediately! Vulnerabilitiew limited time offer! Get a custom sample essay written according to your requirements urgent 3h delivery guaranteed Order Now. Answers: 1. Yes 3. Advisory — Solution This security update resolves four privately reported vulnerabilities and one publicly disclosed vulnerability in Internet Explorer.

Advisory — Solution Solution: This security update resolves seven privately reported vulnerabilities and one publicly disclosed vulnerability in Internet Explorer. All rights reserved. Copying is wbat available for logged-in users. If vulnerabklities need this sample for free, we can send it to how to get to montmorency falls from quebec city via email Send.

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Answer the following questions based on the critical security bulletins for the past 12 months: 1. What vulnerabilities exist for this workgroup LAN based on the bulletins? List five of them Identify and document at least three critical security vulnerabilities and the solutions related to . What vulnerabilities exist for this workgroup LAN based on the bulletins and the update guide? List five of them. Identify and document at least three critical security vulnerabilities and the solutions related to the client operating systems. Self-Assessment Checklist. I identified at least five vulnerabilities for this workgroup LAN. Sep 21,  · Answer the following questions based on the critical security bulletins for the past 12 months (): What vulnerabilities exist for this workgroup LAN based on the bulletins? List five of them. Identify and document at least three critical security vulnerabilities and the solutions related to the client operating systems.

Today's state-of-the-art network security appliances do a great job of keeping the cyber monsters from invading your business. But what do you do when the monster is actually inside the security perimeter? Unfortunately, all of the crosses, garlic, wooden stakes and silver bullets in the world have little effect on today's most nefarious cyber creatures. Here are the top 10 ways your network can be attacked from inside and what you can do to insure your business never has to perform an exorcism on your servers.

USB thumb drives: Believe it or not, USB drives are actually one of, if not the most, common ways you can infect a network from inside a firewall.

There are several reasons for this; they're inexpensive, small, hold a lot of data and can be used between multiple computer types. The ubiquity of thumb drives has driven hackers to develop targeted malware, such as the notorious Conficker worm, that can automatically execute upon connecting with a live USB port.

What's worse is that default operating system configurations typically allow most programs including malicious ones to run automatically.

That's the equivalent of everyone in your neighborhood having an electric garage door opener and being able to use it to open everyone else's garage doors. What to do: Change the computer's default autorun policies. You can find information on how do that within Windows environments here.

Laptop and netbooks: Laptops are discreet, portable, include full operating systems, can operate using an internal battery and come with a handy Ethernet port for tapping directly into a network. What's more, a notebook may already have malicious code running in the background that is tasked to scour the network and find additional systems to infect.

This notebook could belong to an internal employee or guest who's visiting and working from an open cube or office. Beyond infected laptops compromising an internal network, it's important to think about the laptops themselves. All companies have some forms of sensitive information that absolutely cannot leave the walls of the building salary information, medical records, home addresses, phone numbers and Social Security numbers are just a few obvious examples.

It becomes very dangerous when that information is stored on an unsecured portable computer, as they are easy to walk off with. We've seen numerous, publicly disclosed instances of notebooks with sensitive data that have "gone missing.

What to do: Implement an encrypted file system for sensitive data. There are a number of off-the-shelf solutions out there to choose from, along with open source ones such as TrueCrypt. Control over endpoints that enter and exit the internal system is also important. Wireless access points: Wireless APs provide immediate connectivity to any user within proximity of the network.

Wireless attacks by wardrivers people in vehicles searching for unsecured Wi-Fi networks are common and have caused significant damage in the past. TJ Stores, owners of Marshalls and TJMaxx, was attacked using this method, and intruders penetrated the company's computer systems that process and store customer transactions including credit card, debit card, check and merchandise return transactions.

Wireless APs are naturally insecure, regardless if encryption is used or not. Protocols such as wireless encryption protocol contain known vulnerabilities that are easily compromised with attack frameworks, such as Aircrack.

More robust protocols such as wireless protected access WPA and WPA2 are still prone to dictionary attacks if strong keys are not used. Strong, mixed passwords should be used and changed on a fairly frequent basis. Generally, wireless APs are connected for convenience, so it is usually not necessary to have them connected to a working environment.

Many devices are also capable of storing data on common file systems that can be read and written to through a USB or similar connection. Since it isn't the primary function of these devices, they are often forgotten as a potential threat. The fact is, if an endpoint can read and execute data from the device, it can pose just as much of a threat as a thumb drive.

These devices include digital cameras, MP3 players, printers, scanners, fax machines and even digital picture frames. In , Best Buy reported that they found a virus in the Insignia picture frames they were selling at Christmas that came directly from the manufacturer.

What to do: Implement and enforce asset control and policies around what devices can enter the environment and when. And then follow that up with frequent policy reminders.

Inside connections: Internal company employees can also inadvertently or intentionally access areas of the network that they wouldn't or shouldn't otherwise have access to and compromise endpoints using any of the means outlined in this article. Maybe the employee "borrows" a co-worker's machine while he's away at lunch.

Maybe the employee asks a fellow worker for help accessing an area of the network that he doesn't have access to. What to do: Passwords should be changed regularly. Authentication and access levels are a must for any employee -- he should only have access to systems, file shares, etc.

Any special requests should always be escalated to a team not a single user with authority who can authorize the request. The Trojan human: Like the Trojan horse, the Trojan human comes into a business in some type of disguise. He could be in business attire or dressed like legitimate repairman appliance, telecom, HVAC. These types of tricksters have been known to penetrate some pretty secure environments, including server rooms.

Through our own social conditioning, we have the tendency to not stop and question an appropriately attired person we don't recognize in our office environment.

An employee may not think twice about swiping their access card to allow a uniformed worker into their environment for servicing. It can take less than a minute for an unsupervised person in a server room to infect the network. What to do: Reminders should be sent to employees about authorizing third parties.

Identify the source by asking questions, not making assumptions. Optical media: In June , an Army intelligence analyst was arrested after being charged with stealing and leaking confidential data to public networks. Sources claim the analyst did so by bringing in music CDs labeled with popular recording artists, using this medium only as a guise. Once he had access to a networked workstation, he would access the classified information he had authorized credentials for and store the data on the "music" CDs in encrypted archives.

To help cover his tracks, the analyst would lip sync to the music that was supposedly stored on the CDs while at his workstation. Recordable media that appear to be legitimate can and has been used to piggyback data in and out of networks.

And, like the thumb drives mentioned above, they can be used as a source for network infection. What to do: As with the USB tip, it's important to implement and enforce asset control and policies around what devices can enter the environment and when. Who is watching you when you log into your desktop? Where are your hard copies stored? What confidential documents are you reading on your laptop at the coffee shop, airplane, etc.?

What to do: The best safeguard is being conscious and alert about this threat whenever working on sensitive material -- even if it means stopping what you're doing momentarily to observe your surroundings. Smartphones and other digital devices: Today, phones do more than just allow you to call anyone in the world from anywhere; they're full-functioning computers, complete with Wi-Fi connectivity, multithreaded operating systems, high storage capacity, high-resolution cameras and vast application support.

And they, along with other portable tablet-like devices, are starting to be given the green light in business environments. These new devices have the potential to pose the same threats we've seen with notebooks and thumb drives. What's more, these devices also have the potential to elude traditional data-leak prevention solutions. What's to stop a user from taking a high-resolution picture of a computer screen, and then e-mailing it over a phone's 3G network?

What to do: The same rules for USB devices and optical media apply here. Implement and enforce asset control and policies around what devices can enter the environment and when. E-mail: E-mail is frequently used within businesses to send and receive data; however, it's often misused. Messages with confidential information can easily be forwarded to any external target. In addition, the e-mails themselves can carry nasty viruses. One targeted e-mail could phish for access credentials from an employee.

These stolen credentials would then be leveraged in a second-stage attack. What to do: With e-mail security, source identification is key. Identify the sender using technology such as PGP, or a simple array of questions before sending sensitive information. Access control to broad alias-based e-mail addresses should be enforced. And policy and reminders should be sent out to employees.

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